We believe in teachers and their ability to transform young lives. By providing professional development and classroom resources, programs such as MySci help teachers help students.

NSF outreach effort promotes thermodynamics education

NSF outreach effort promotes thermodynamics education

Elijah Thimsen, associate professor of energy, environmental & chemical engineering, and educators from area school districts work together to make chemistry concepts more accessible to high school students. In May, the McKelvey School of Engineering hosted 22 students from Clayton, St. Charles and Belleville, Illinois for a daylong, hands-on lesson on thermodynamics.
mySci teachers spend summer building skills 

mySci teachers spend summer building skills 

Some 60 area teachers gathered at WashU for mySci Summer Institutes, a professional development opportunity designed for teachers new to mySci, as well as mySci veterans. “As a teacher, there are still a lot of things I don’t know, but I don’t need to be that giant teacher who knows all,” teacher LaWesha Bush said. “mySci takes away a lot of that stress, and it’s great for engaging not only students, but teachers. I appreciate that.”
Creating time and space for collaborative school change

Creating time and space for collaborative school change

Classmates at Ritenour Middle School have been testing their tolerance for struggle during math classes led by a  teacher who is presenting math concepts with a high-level task approach that gives students a newfound ownership of their learning and an invitation to reach the right answer with thinking that makes sense to them.
Mud pies, math and mess with meaning

Mud pies, math and mess with meaning

Early childhood math skills are important predictors of later academic achievement, but opportunities for young children to engage in math learning are extremely limited in preschool. With support from the Institute for School Partnership at Washington University in St. Louis (ISP), the JGECEC teaching team is making sure their new mud kitchen and curriculum throughout the building are planned with early math learning in mind.
Chalker Lab and ISP use Tetrahymena to expand hands-on science in K-12 classrooms

Chalker Lab and ISP use Tetrahymena to expand hands-on science in K-12 classrooms

Douglas Chalker, professor of biology, received a collaborative award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to support the ASSET program, which incorporates Tetrahymena, a ciliated protozoan,  into elementary science. Chalker, in collaboration with the Institute for School Partnership (ISP), plans to expand the program’s reach in St. Louis and incorporate more mathematics and computational thinking into program’s hands-on lessons.