Our education experts collaborate every day with teachers, school administrators and civic leaders to improve outcomes for all students. The future of our schools — and our region — depends on it.

COVID-19 and Race: Educational Equity in a New Era

COVID-19 and Race: Educational Equity in a New Era

When COVID-19 forced schools to change how they facilitated learning, long-standing race and class divides in our educational systems became more distinct than ever. The Clark-Fox Policy Institute lead a discussion with Sharonica Hardin-Bartley, superintendent of University City School District; Terry Harris, executive director of student services at Rockwood School District; Sherita Love, founding director […]
Who Will Help Children? Building Brain Regimes

Who Will Help Children? Building Brain Regimes

William F. Tate, dean of the Graduate School and vice provost for graduate education, calls for the region to build a public-private “a brain regime” to protect the region’s children. Key recommendations including improving the region’s teachers, strengthening K-12 STEM education and reclaiming those students who have been pushed out of schools.
A new life, a new language

A new life, a new language

Cindy Brantmeier, professor of applied linguistics and education, has designed a social reading program that employs online games to help adolescent refugees and immigrants. The results are promising — test scores have improved along with student confidence.
Who will teach tomorrow’s coders

Who will teach tomorrow’s coders

High school students need computer science skills, but who will teach them? The Institute for School Partnership is addressing Missouri’s desperate shortage of computer science educators through the Code.org professional learning program, which prepares educators with no coding experience to lead computer science classes. The need is urgent: only one-third of Missouri high schools offer computer science.
High school students should study earth science. Here’s why

High school students should study earth science. Here’s why

Ever wonder why some subjects are taught in high school while others are not, or why students spend so much time memorizing facts? According to Washington University geophysicist Michael Wysession, science curricula in the US are based on standards that are more than 120 years old, and being stuck in the past has had serious consequences. Wysession is bringing a new approach to science education to St. Louis and beyond.
Partnership launches a health center at Normandy High School

Partnership launches a health center at Normandy High School

A new health center at Normandy High School will provide students much-needed primary health care and behavioral health services. For the Sake of All, an initiative led by Jason Purnell of Washington University in St. Louis, has identified school-based health centers as a key strategy in tackling health inequities affecting African Americans in the St. Louis region.